Launch of Domain Brokerage, Saw.com

Launch of Domain Brokerage, Saw.com

Saw.com founder Jeffrey Gabriel and co-founder Amanda Waltz were recently featured in an article on dnjournal.com discussing the launch of Saw.com. Ron Jackson explains that Jeff and Amanda’s past success in the domain industry should prepare them for a bright future as they launch their new company. Saw.com enters the domain industry with existing domain leadership and expertise and plans to build its business with an emphasis on personal relationships. Services offered by Saw.com include domain sales, acquisitions, and appraisals, and more.

DnJournal Article

Here is the video from the site: 

Transcript: 

Ron:

Hello, I’m Ron Jackson, the editor and publisher of domain name journals, a domain industry trade magazine, located online at DNjournal.com. With me today are Jeff Gabriel and Amanda Waltz, two longtime friends and two of the most widely known brokers and consultants in the domain industry.

They’re going to be sharing some very exciting news with us today. First, for those of you, and there aren’t a lot of you, but if you haven’t already met or are not familiar with Jeff, a lot of people refer to him as a superstar domain broker. Over the past decade, he’s had domain sales that have entered in the hundreds of millions of dollars. He started with Sedo and not long after he started there he rang up a thirteen million dollar domain sale that was the largest ever recorded and remained so for eight years up until just this past summer when voice.com was sold for thirty million dollars. After that, Jeff went to Domain Advisors who later rebranded as Igloo and served as the president there. Most recently, he wrapped up a seven-year career at Uniregistry, which is a great domain sales and registration service based in the Cayman Islands. In August, Jeff moved from the Caymans back to his home area in the Greater Boston area in Massachusetts. Amanda, similarly, is one of the great brokers in this industry.

You probably haven’t heard as much about her sales because so many of Amanda’s corporate clients insist on non-disclosure agreements, but insiders know that she has had some of the top sales that have happened in our business over the last ten years or more. If you want more information by the way on Jeff, I meant to mention that I told his entire life story in a cover story that’s in the archive at DMjournal.com that was published in 2016. Now, Jeff, I think that we have something I guess, I’m just going to have to ask if you’re ready to let the cat out of the bag?

Jeff:

Yeah, I’m excited to announce that Amanda and myself are launching a domain brokerage and sales consultation service. What we’re going to be doing is educating our clients, using educational materials, to help them understand the sales process and values. We’ll also work hand-in-hand with portfolio holders to help unlock the values of their portfolios; Increase their return on their investments.

 

Ron:

Amanda, what can you tell us about it?

Amanda:

I would take that a step further too to say that we have been working with worldwide brands and agencies and are going to continue to do that in this new business. We feel that several brands truly don’t understand the value of what a generic or descriptive domain can do for their business.

Ron:

We’ve just started to scratch a surface and hope to continue to do so. I had mentioned that Jeff met during their time at Igloo. I’m kind of curious; here you are today entering a new partnership. What was it, Jeff, that you saw in Amanda when you first met her and through the years since then? Attributes that made you feel like she was the right partner?

Jeff:

I think Amanda is one of the best salespeople I’ve ever met and what makes a great salesperson is somebody that has an intimate knowledge of the products that they’re selling; that they have a professional demeanor at all times and that they have a consistent work ethic. Amanda possesses all of those things.

When we were at Igloo, we shared similar qualities and values about life and business. When I left and went to Uniregistry, working at a competing company, we stayed in touch.

We continued to make sales together and we also remained friends.

Ron:

I have a feeling it’s a mutual admiration society or you wouldn’t be starting the company together, but I’m curious also Amanda, what was it about Jeff that do you think that he’s the right partner in this next venture?

Amanda:

Yeah, absolutely! I think Jeff is a great negotiator.

I think to be a good salesperson and to do the best and the right thing by your customer, you have to be a good listener. Jeff has a unique quality that I think most sales leaders have, but he has a unique way of negotiating. I think that he has the tenacity to get what customers want and need very effectively and I think that our customers have followed him from one place to the next and I think that that’s a real compliment to him, but also sales in general. People buy from people and people work with people and I think that bringing a buyer and seller together and creating a strong concept of why they should buy from each other needs to have a good negotiation process. I’ve always been incredibly impressed when I’m negotiating with him on the same team as well as when I’m bringing a buyer to buy an asset that he’s representing.

He’s a very tough negotiator.

Ron:

You know we all love domains and it caught my eye right away when I saw your brand name Saw.com, and a great tagline, “be seen,” which is the entire objective of having a domain name, a website, a brand of any kind. So those who love domains are gonna wonder because we all value one-word dictionary domains, the shorter the better. And .coms are the ultimate thing to achieve as a brand and that’s why they change hands obviously for a lot of money.

So what’s this story behind Saw.com. Who brought that to the table? What was the concept behind the brand that you’re launching?

Jeff:

Well, the advice we give to our customers regularly is that a short, sweet, easy to spell domain name is the most important thing you can do for your business. It makes you memorable. You can advertise it and people will remember it and tell their friends about it and create repeat business. So if we’re going to give that advice to our customers, then we should probably take our own medicine.

Ron:

There’s a perfect example of doing that.

Jeff:

Absolutely.

Ron:

And speaking of that as a brand, Amanda, I understand that part of your business services, I’m not sure if we went into detail on that, but you’re going to offer a consultation on acquiring the right kind of brand building a brand that will all be part of the offering of Saw.com?

Amanda:

Yes, absolutely.

Sometimes, when companies are coming to us, or in the past when coming to us, they have a very specific domain name that they want us to help them acquire. And then other times they aren’t sure what they’re looking for. They understand their business, they understand their product and their service. So we’ll talk about that with them and then we cast a net out to some of our customers, some of our sellers and make that match. So again, you know, building upon the question that you had for Jeff about Saw.com, we want to make sure that we understand what they’re trying to achieve and then go out and find them the best options that meet their needs.

Ron:

We have a lot of different kinds of participants in the domain industry.  They’re part-timers, I know t people 18 to 80 years old. Some full-time professionals make millions of dollars, so there’s a lot of different kinds of people watching.

What kinds of clients do you think would benefit most from the services that Saw.com offers?

Jeff:

I think there are many different types, so we’re focusing a lot of our energy and our time in our resource section. What you’ll be able to see on our website is an immense amount of education about the industry. It is information that Amanda and I came up with that people can reference and that’s targeted towards entry-level domain investors, but mainly towards a lot of the corporates. We speak to some heads of marketing regularly that might come up with a brand name. They write the copy, they have everything ready to go, but then they go to acquire the domain and didn’t budget for it and they weren’t ready for it and then they speak to us and there’s almost a feeling of shock on the phone when they hear what our estimated price might be or what we’re walking into when we go to acquire this. I think that happens for a lot of reasons. For one, there isn’t a lot of information that is readily available to people. On the other hand, we have long-standing relationships. I have some that are close to 10 years old in the industry with domain investors or portfolio holders, and those that own some great domains and those are people that we’re going to focus on and work with to help sell their names at a fair market price and then everybody in-between.

Ron:

There one thing I wanted to bring up for people who are watching and would like to meet the two of you is that the industry’s biggest annual conference is coming up at the end of January, which is Namescon in Austin. I assume you’ll both be there. Can people who want to know more speak to you in person about it?

Jeff:

Absolutely, yes we plan to be there. We’re excited about the new location this year and we hope to see lots of familiar faces and hopefully meet some new people as well

Ron:

Something that is not directly Saw related, but I think I would be remiss having two of you who know the markets so well here without asking you about… Every now and then you’ll see something online where someone says “Oh, well domains are kind of going away, social media is replacing it.” But I know just from the weekly sales reports we do at DNjournal in just a recent week here we had the chart topped by a one and a quarter million dollar sale for one domain name TM dot-com. We had a numeric domain name 6500.com 120,000 dollars. We had three orgs in the top 20 dawn.org $50,000, a great domain name. And even country code domains. We had a half dozen in the top 20, so it doesn’t look like domains are going out of favor anytime soon from what I can see.

Jeff:

From my point of view, there is no lack of million-dollar offers that are happening right now on quality domain names and there’s no lack of demand on the lower valued domains and I haven’t seen it let up at all for several years, and I don’t see it letting up anytime soon. People talk about social media and apps replacing domain names, but I still do not see a technology that is going to make it that people just do not need domain names. Whether it’s for email and their website’s branding or whatever it might be, it is still a huge part of every business.

 

Ron:

Amanda, what are your thoughts on the current state of the market? What you’ve seen, and at least the near-term projections, for what’s going to be happening with it?

Amanda:

Absolutely. I agree with Jeff and to your point about what’s going on on DNJournal weekly. I think a lot of those sales that you mentioned are just the tip of the iceberg. There are so many unreported six-figure, seven-figure, high five-figure sales that I know about and then the ones that are in the pipeline (the ones that are the brand owners or the startups that haven’t named their brand yet) that we, and many other people in the industry, are currently working with.

What I do find is that there’s a shortage of really good one-word coms to be able to offer to our clients. So you know, we would like to start to be able to talk with some of the corporate clients or the corporations that are out there that are not properly utilizing their one-word coms. Maybe they’re just using them as a redirect. There’s a lot of untapped domain names out there right now that I think should be used in a more meaningful way.

Ron:

I think owning your own domain name as your internet home is something that really can’t be stressed enough because I’ve seen so many small businesses who say “well I have a Facebook page now so I don’t need anything else” or “I’m on Twitter or I’m here or I’m there”. The problem is that you don’t own any of that and if you run afoul of their rules they can pull the plug on you instantly. It can be a minor infraction and a lot of times they don’t even tell you why you were taken off. So basically, what you’ve done if you don’t have a domain and website as your primary home, you’re turning the keys over to your entire enterprise to someone and just say, “you know, I hope that this isn’t going to come back and bite me,” but too many times I’ve seen this. And I guess this is the kind of thing that when the branding part of your business and protection consulting all of that. That’s a point that you no doubt drive home consistently as well.

Jeff:

I think social media complements a great website. The problem with social media is two-pronged. The first is that social media falls out of favor with particular age groups as time goes on. Additionally, whatever content you put on most social media sites isn’t yours and that could become a problem in the future.

Ron:

Okay, we covered a lot of bases here today Jeff and Amanda. Just before I say goodbye, is there anything you would like to add?

Jeff:

We look forward to working with you as Saw.com.

Ron:

All right, Amanda?

Amanda:

And seeing you in Austin in a few weeks.

Ron:

Okay, Jeff and Amanda thank you so much. And best of luck in this exciting new chapter.

January 13, 2020